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Home » Recent Articles » A Clinico-Epidemiological study of the burden and outcome of Vector Borne Diseases in a Tertiary Care Hospital, Bengaluru

A Clinico-Epidemiological study of the burden and outcome of Vector Borne Diseases in a Tertiary Care Hospital, Bengaluru

Background: Vector borne diseases (VBDs) represent a substantial burden in many low and lower middle-income countries, including India. India has become hyper endemic for Dengue, and has the largest population in the world at risk of malaria. In view of rising incidence and geographical spread of VBDs, we conducted a study of vector borne disease admissions and outcomes in a major teaching hospital of Bengaluru, with the aim of determining the sociodemographic profile, bed occupancy rates, treatment outcomes. Methods: We analysed case sheets of all patients admitted for suspected vector borne diseases, during the period 1st January to 31st December 2012, in a major tertiary care and teaching hospital located centrally in Bengaluru city. Results: During January-December 2012, 12696 patients were admitted to medicine wards, of whom suspected VBDs numbered 1209, i.e.10% approximately. Majority of patients were males aged 16-25 years, residents of Bengaluru, Tumakuru and Chikkaballapur. Highest number of admissions occurred in August and September, and lowest in May. Dengue was confirmed in 376 patients and malaria in 78, and 3 patients tested positive for Chikungunya. Average bed occupancy was 4 days/patient. Fifty patients died, giving a mortality outcome of 4.14% among VBD cases and proportional VBD mortality of 2.95% out of 1696 total deaths in Medicine wards. Conclusions: In view of rapid expansion of Bengaluru city and urbanization of surrounding areas, with inevitable unplanned construction and ecological modification, we may expect the incidence of vector borne diseases to increase further in future, with resultant heavy burden of morbidity, mortality and increased stress on the health care delivery systems. It is imperative to carry out widespread mosquito control measures and conduct comprehensive grassroots awareness and education campaigns to minimise the incidence of vector borne diseases.

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